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Recapitulation and Comparison: Contrasting Highlands with Floodplain

Pete Christensen

Peter Christensen is Lecturer at the Institute of History, University of Copenhagen and at the Danish Institute for Study Abroad, Copenhagen. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Steve Sampson

Steve Sampson

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The Decline of Iranshahr : Irrigation and Environment in the Middle East, 500 bc–ad 1500

I.B.Tauris, 2016

Book chapter

...Like Mesopotamia, the Plateau clearly saw a considerable expansion of settlement and irrigation in Parthian and Sassanian times. Moreover, again like Mesopotamia, state-directed colonization appears to have been a key part in the process...

Smallpox in the Harem: Communicable Diseases and the Ottoman Fear of Dynastic Extinction During the Early Sultanate of Ahmed I (R. 1603–17)

Günhan Börekçi

Günhan Börekçi is Assistant Professor of History at İstanbul Şehir University. After completing his BA and MA studies at Boğaziçi University (1991­1999), Börekçi received his PhD degree in history from the Ohio State University in 2010. His main areas of research and teaching include early modern Ottoman political, dynastic, and social history, the seventeenthcentury crisis, military history, and traditional archery. In addition to numerous articles and encyclopedia entries on Ottoman history, he has published with Ahmet Arslantürk a facsimile edition of Feridun Ahmed Bey’s illustrated chronicle, Nüzhet-i Esrârü’l-Ahyâr der Ahbâr-ı Sefer-i Sigetvar (Topkapı Palace Museum Library, ms. Hazine 1339), on Suleyman the Magnificent’s last Hungarian campaign in 1566 (2012) and more recently, his study on the Ottoman imperial campaign against the Habsburgs in 1596 came out under the title Macaristan’da Bir Osmanlı Padişahı: Sultan III. Mehmed’in Eğri Seferi Rûznâmesi – 1596 (An Ottoman Sultan in Hungary: Sultan Mehmed III’s Eger Campaign Diary – 1596) (2016).I am most grateful to our editor Nükhet Varlık for her much valuable comments on earlier drafts, and to Maurizio Alfioldi for providing the transcriptions of the Venetian ambassadorial dispatches utilized in this study. The following discussion is partly based on my PhD dissertation: Günhan Börekçi, “Factions and Favorites at the Courts of Ahmed I (r. 1603­1617) and His Immediate Predecessors,” PhD diss., Ohio State University, 2010. The initial research for this article was carried out under the generous fellowships by the American Research Institute in Turkey (ARIT) and the Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations (RCAC) of the Koç University back in 2007 and 2008, respectively. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Plague and Contagion in the Islamic Mediterranean : New Histories of Disease in Ottoman Society

Arc Humanities Press, 2017

Book chapter

...I am most grateful to our editor Nükhet Varlık for her much valuable comments on earlier drafts, and to Maurizio Alfioldi for providing the transcriptions of the Venetian ambassadorial dispatches utilized in this study. The following...

Health, Disease, and the Medieval Body

Ann G. Carmichael

Ann G. Carmichael is an historical epidemiologist originally trained in medicine and now emerita at Indiana University. She specializes in the history of plague and other infectious diseases, particularly in late medieval and Renaissance Italy. She is currently completing a study of mortality and public health in Sforza-era Milan (1450–1535). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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A Cultural History of the Human Body in the Medieval Age

Bloomsbury Academic, 2010

Book chapter

...Diet and environment shape the physical health and disease risks of human populations. Because people in the Middle Ages accepted different notions and concepts of health and disease than we hold today, it can be confusing to build...

Plague in Eighteenth-Century Cairo: in Search of Burial and Memorial Sites

ednA Bonhomme

Edna Bonhomme is a history of science doctoral candidate at Princeton University who focuses on the history of epidemics and funeral rites in North Africa and the Middle East. She graduated from Reed College with a BA in Biology and from Columbia University with an MPH in Sociomedical Sciences. Before beginning her graduate work at Princeton, she worked as a research assistant in an immunology/genetics laboratory, coordinated with human rights groups in Haiti, and conducted public health research in New York City. Her dissertation examines plague, urbanization, and funeral rites in eighteenth­century Cairo and Tunis. Taking pre­colonial medical outbreaks as its point of departure, this project also sheds light on black slaves, public health, and quarantine measures. Additionally, this work entails conducting fieldwork in Cairene and Tunisian cemeteries for the purposes of understanding the relationship between eighteenth­century tombstones and twenty­first century cemeteries. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Plague and Contagion in the Islamic Mediterranean : New Histories of Disease in Ottoman Society

Arc Humanities Press, 2017

Book chapter

...Unmarked site, epidemics and mass Burial: fieldwork of the dead“Utopias are sites with no real place.”— Michel FoucaultMichel Foucault, “Of Other Spaces,” Diacritics 16, no. 1 (1986): 22–27, quote on 24.Michel Foucault, “Of Other Spaces...

Medicine and the Senses: Feeling the Pulse, Smelling the Plague, and Listening for the Cure

A Cultural History of the Senses in the Middle Ages

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

Book chapter

...A sign of change in the quality of the body happens in four ways: either by sight as in jaundice, morphew, a blackened tongue and the like; or by smell, such as fetid breath or sweat [that smells like] a lobster or a he-goat or the like...

The Valley of Disease

Barbara Reynolds

Barbara Reynolds is one of the world's best known Dante scholars. She completed the Penguin translation of Paradiso after the death of Dorothy L Sayers. She also translated Dante's early work La Vita Nuova and Ariosto's Orlando Furioso. In addition, she has written a biography of Dorothy L Sayers and edited The Cambridge Itallan Dictionary. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Dante : The Poet, the Thinker, the Man

I.B.Tauris, 2006

Book chapter

...Gazing at the vast number of souls with their horrifying wounds, Dante feels so overwhelmed that he is about to weep. Virgil asks him ironically if he is trying to count the souls. If so, he must realize that the ditch is 22 miles round...

Health and Hygiene: Hair in the Medical Traditions

A Cultural History of Hair in the Middle Ages

Bloomsbury Academic, 2019

Book chapter

...In medieval Latin Europe, hair was a common object of interest for both health practitioners and the lay public alike. From a theoretical and an empirical point of view, hair was connected to health and disease, and practices involving its...

Veterinary Medicine in Nineteenth-Century Egypt

Alan Mikhail

Alan mikhail is Professor of History at Yale University. He is the author of Under Osman’s Tree: The Ottoman Empire, Egypt and Environmental History, The Animal in Ottoman Egypt, and Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt: An Environmental History; and the editor of Water on Sand: Environmental Histories of the Middle East and North Africa. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Plague and Contagion in the Islamic Mediterranean : New Histories of Disease in Ottoman Society

Arc Humanities Press, 2017

Book chapter

...The Human­Animal Relationship is an essential aspect of understanding the past and present of all societies.On this topic in Ottoman Egypt, see Alan Mikhail, The Animal in Ottoman Egypt (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014), from which...

The Crisis of the Seventh Century: Environmental and Demographic Disaster

Pete Christensen

Peter Christensen is Lecturer at the Institute of History, University of Copenhagen and at the Danish Institute for Study Abroad, Copenhagen. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Steve Sampson

Steve Sampson

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The Decline of Iranshahr : Irrigation and Environment in the Middle East, 500 bc–ad 1500

I.B.Tauris, 2016

Book chapter

...Shortly after the completing of the great Nahrawan system, Mesopotamia was ravaged by a series of disasters: civil wars, invasions, floods, and epidemics. The combined effect was devastating and by late Sassanian times the southern part...

Heterogeneous Immunological Landscapes and Medieval Plague: An Invitation to a New Dialogue Between Historians and Immunologists

Fabian Crespo

Fabian Crespo is a biological anthropologist specializing in human evolutionary immunology. In 2001, he moved from the University of Buenos Aires to the Department of Anthropology at the University of Louisville, Kentucky, where he began to develop the working hypothesis that different pathogenic experiences in the past have shaped the immune systems in different human populations. Since 2010, two experiences have greatly influenced this research: his participation in the Global History of Health Project at the Ohio State University, and the NEH Summer Seminar, “Health and Disease in the Middle Ages,” directed by Dr. Monica Green and Dr. Rachel Scott, in 2012. He is currently working on the Black Death’s impact on the immune systems of human populations and testing the potential role of cross immunity in the decline of medieval leprosy in Europe. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Matthem B. Lawrenz

Matthew B. Lawrenz is a microbiologist at the Center for Predictive Medicine for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, at the University of Louisville’s School of Medicine. He is interested in understanding how bacterial pathogens are able to infect and cause disease in humans, and since 2003 he has been studying the interactions between Yersinia pestis (the bacterium that causes human plague) and mammalian hosts. Specifically, Dr. Lawrenz’s laboratory works to identify the factors that allow Y pestis to cause disease and to understand how the bacillus is able to avoid detection and elimination by the innate immune system (i.e., by macrophages). Dr. Lawrenz’s long-term goal is to use the information from these studies to aid in the design of new vaccines and therapeutic treatments to combat bacterial infection. Prior to his work with Y pestis, Dr. Lawrenz studied Lyme Disease, an emerging bacterial infection that is transmitted by ticks, and helped develop the serological test used to diagnosis this infection. In 2012, Dr. Lawrenz began collaborating with Dr. Crespo to understand the potential impact of the Black Death on the evolution of the immune system in human populations. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The Medieval Globe : Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death

Arc Medieval Press, 2014

Book chapter

...Efforts to understand the differential mortality caused by plague must account for many factors, including human immune responses. In this essay we are particularly interested in those people who were exposed to the Yersinia pestis pathogen...