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Dionysios Stathakopoulos

Dionysios Stathakopoulos is Lecturer in Byzantine Studies at King's College London. He is the author of Famine and Pestilence in the Late Roman and Byzantine Empire (2004). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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A Short History of the Byzantine Empire

I.B. Tauris, 2015

Book chapter

0

...The reigns of Byzantine emperors are given in bold; those of Western Roman emperors in bold italics...

Negotiating Retraction, 602–717

Dionysios Stathakopoulos

Dionysios Stathakopoulos is Lecturer in Byzantine Studies at King's College London. He is the author of Famine and Pestilence in the Late Roman and Byzantine Empire (2004). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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A Short History of the Byzantine Empire

I.B. Tauris, 2015

Book chapter

0

...The brief reign of Phokas proved catastrophic. In the East, Khusro launched a war to avenge Maurice, giving him a pretext for a show of strength to his own elites. This war would last more than two decades. The Persians seemed unstoppable...

From Survival to Revival, 717–867

Dionysios Stathakopoulos

Dionysios Stathakopoulos is Lecturer in Byzantine Studies at King's College London. He is the author of Famine and Pestilence in the Late Roman and Byzantine Empire (2004). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

A Short History of the Byzantine Empire

I.B. Tauris, 2015

Book chapter

0

...Once more an emperor with a military pedigree, Leo, born of Isaurian parents in Syria, was called to save the Empire. He had been made strategos of the Anatolikon around 713 and had allied himself with Artabasdos, the strategos...

The Appearance of Strength, 1056–1204

Dionysios Stathakopoulos

Dionysios Stathakopoulos is Lecturer in Byzantine Studies at King's College London. He is the author of Famine and Pestilence in the Late Roman and Byzantine Empire (2004). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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A Short History of the Byzantine Empire

I.B. Tauris, 2015

Book chapter

0

...Theodora’s chosen successor, the elderly Michael VI, barely reigned – he was challenged by an uprising of Anatolian commanders headed by Isaac Komnenos, a military aristocrat from Paphlagonia, in northern Anatolia, who was himself crowned...

Expansion and Radiance, 867–1056

Dionysios Stathakopoulos

Dionysios Stathakopoulos is Lecturer in Byzantine Studies at King's College London. He is the author of Famine and Pestilence in the Late Roman and Byzantine Empire (2004). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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A Short History of the Byzantine Empire

I.B. Tauris, 2015

Book chapter

0

...Basil I became the founder of the Macedonian dynasty, one of the most long-lasting ruling houses in Byzantine history and ushered in an era of military expansion, economic boom and a cultural revival. For many this represented the apogee...

The Legacy of Fragmentation, 1204–1341

Dionysios Stathakopoulos

Dionysios Stathakopoulos is Lecturer in Byzantine Studies at King's College London. He is the author of Famine and Pestilence in the Late Roman and Byzantine Empire (2004). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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A Short History of the Byzantine Empire

I.B. Tauris, 2015

Book chapter

0

...The conquest and sack of Constantinople in April 1204 was a defining moment in the history of Byzantium. Even though the city was recaptured in 1261, the centrifugal forces strengthened by these events would define the history of the region...

Heading for the Fall, 1341–1453

Dionysios Stathakopoulos

Dionysios Stathakopoulos is Lecturer in Byzantine Studies at King's College London. He is the author of Famine and Pestilence in the Late Roman and Byzantine Empire (2004). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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A Short History of the Byzantine Empire

I.B. Tauris, 2015

Book chapter

0

...Soon after the death of Andronikos III in 1341 a conflict arose between two parties vying for power. The first was headed by John Kantakouzenos, the trusted friend of the deceased and the force behind his government. Kantakouzenos expected...

Becoming the Eastern Roman Empire, 330–491

Dionysios Stathakopoulos

Dionysios Stathakopoulos is Lecturer in Byzantine Studies at King's College London. He is the author of Famine and Pestilence in the Late Roman and Byzantine Empire (2004). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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A Short History of the Byzantine Empire

I.B. Tauris, 2015

Book chapter

0

...In May 330 Constantinople was officially inaugurated to mark Constantine’s final victory against Licinius. This city and the Emperor’s adoption of Christianity were the most lasting of his legacies. Constantine’s last years were relatively...

Masters of the Mediterranean, 491–602

Dionysios Stathakopoulos

Dionysios Stathakopoulos is Lecturer in Byzantine Studies at King's College London. He is the author of Famine and Pestilence in the Late Roman and Byzantine Empire (2004). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

A Short History of the Byzantine Empire

I.B. Tauris, 2015

Book chapter

0

...After the death of Zeno the crowds gathered at the Hippodrome compelled the Empress Ariadne, widow and daughter of emperors, to select the next ruler, demanding an Orthodox emperor and a Roman – that is, not an Isaurian. She chose...

Aftermath and Afterlife

Dionysios Stathakopoulos

Dionysios Stathakopoulos is Lecturer in Byzantine Studies at King's College London. He is the author of Famine and Pestilence in the Late Roman and Byzantine Empire (2004). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

A Short History of the Byzantine Empire

I.B. Tauris, 2015

Book chapter

0

...The fall of Constantinople marks the end of the Byzantine state, but not of all things Byzantine. There were still various pockets of unconquered Byzantine territories in 1453, and some Latin-controlled states whose population...